How Do I Fix Code P01355 min read

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how do i fix code p0135

One common reason for the check engine light to come on is the code p0135, which is related to the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In this article, we’ll show you how to fix code p0135.

The first step is to find out what’s causing the code p0135. There are a few things that could be causing it, such as a leak in the EGR system, a dirty or clogged EGR valve, or a problem with the EGR solenoid.

If you suspect that the EGR valve is the problem, the next step is to clean it. You can do this by spraying it with a degreaser or cleaning it with a brush.

If the EGR valve is clean and the problem is still not fixed, the next step is to check the EGR solenoid. You can do this by disconnecting the solenoid and checking for continuity. If there is no continuity, the solenoid is bad and needs to be replaced.

If the EGR valve and solenoid are both clean and in good working order, the next step is to check the vacuum lines. If any of the vacuum lines are damaged or disconnected, they will need to be replaced.

If none of the above steps fix the code p0135, the next step is to have the code p0135 diagnosed by a mechanic. There could be a problem with the ECM or the engine that requires further diagnosis.

What can cause a P0135 code?

The P0135 code is a generic code for a problem with the oxygen sensor. Many things can cause this code, but the most common are a bad oxygen sensor, a wiring problem, or a problem with the engine management system.

A bad oxygen sensor can cause the P0135 code. This sensor measures the amount of oxygen in the exhaust stream and sends this information to the engine management system. If the sensor is bad, it may not be able to accurately measure the amount of oxygen in the exhaust, which can cause the code.

A wiring problem can also cause the P0135 code. If the wiring to the oxygen sensor is damaged or corroded, it can cause the sensor to malfunction. This can cause the P0135 code to be displayed.

A problem with the engine management system can also cause the P0135 code. If the system is not functioning properly, it may not be able to properly control the oxygen sensor. This can cause the code to be displayed.

What causes a bank 1 sensor 1 code?

A bank 1 sensor 1 code is one of the most common codes that is generated by a car’s computer. This code is generated when there is a problem with the sensor that is located in the bank 1 of the car’s engine. This sensor is responsible for measuring the amount of air that is entering the engine.

There are a few things that can cause this code to be generated. One of the most common causes is a problem with the wiring or the connector that is associated with the sensor. Another common cause is a problem with the sensor itself. This can be caused by a number of things, including a buildup of dirt or oil on the sensor, a problem with the sensor’s wiring, or a problem with the sensor’s electrical connection.

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If the code is generated because of a problem with the sensor, the best thing to do is to replace the sensor. If the code is generated because of a problem with the wiring or the connector, the best thing to do is to clean or replace the wiring or the connector.

Where is the O2 heater sensor located?

The O2 heater sensor is located in the exhaust system of the car. It is responsible for heating up the O2 sensor so that it can more accurately measure the amount of oxygen in the exhaust.

Can you drive with P0135?

If you’re driving with the check engine light on and you see the P0135 code, you may be wondering if you can still drive your car. In most cases, you can drive your car with the P0135 code, but it’s always best to consult your mechanic to get their professional advice.

The P0135 code is usually caused by a bad oxygen sensor, and it can affect your car’s fuel economy and emissions. If your car is exhibiting these symptoms, you should have the sensor replaced as soon as possible.

However, if you’re experiencing other problems with your car, such as a lack of power or difficulty steering, it’s best to have the car towed to a mechanic and have them take a look. Driving with a bad oxygen sensor can cause even more damage to your car, so it’s important to get it fixed as soon as possible.

In most cases, you can drive your car with the P0135 code, but it’s always best to consult your mechanic to get their professional advice.

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Where is the oxygen sensor bank 1 located?

The oxygen sensor bank 1 is located on the exhaust manifold. It is responsible for measuring the amount of oxygen in the exhaust gases. The information collected by the oxygen sensor is used by the engine management system to adjust the air-to-fuel ratio.

How do you fix a heated oxygen sensor?

A heated oxygen sensor, or HO2S, is a component of the emissions control system in most modern cars. It helps to monitor the air-fuel ratio in the engine and adjusts it accordingly. If the HO2S fails, it can cause the engine to run rich or lean, which can lead to decreased fuel economy and even engine damage.

If your car’s HO2S fails, the best way to fix it is to replace it. You can buy a new HO2S from your car’s dealer or an aftermarket supplier. The procedure for replacing a heated oxygen sensor varies depending on the car, but it generally involves removing the air intake system, the exhaust system, and the sensor itself.

Once the old sensor is out, you install the new one and reassemble the car. It’s a good idea to have a qualified mechanic do the job, especially if you’re not familiar with the car’s emissions control system.

How is p0135 diagnosed?

How is p0135 diagnosed?

P0135 is diagnosed by using a scanner to read the code that is stored in the car’s computer. The code will indicate where the problem is.